Boat ride on a subterranean lake

Europe's largest subterranean lake that can be sailed upon lies between Sion and Sierre. The water grotto is easily accessible and there is a boat tour for viewing it. The guides on the boat tell visitors about the history of the cave and its geology. more

Chillon

Ebenalp and Wildkirchli

Even the Neanderthals were on Ebenalp (Eben Alp). There are three caves, and it is proven that prehistoric people once lived in them. Today there... more

Ebenalp and Wildkirchli

"Col-des-Roches" Cave Mills

If brooks and rivers run only sluggishly above ground, hydropower is nearly impossible to harness. That is why the inhabitants of the valley of Le... more

Boat ride on a subterranean lake

Europe's largest subterranean lake that can be sailed upon lies between Sion and Sierre. The water grotto is easily accessible and there is a boat tour for viewing it. The guides on the boat tell visitors about the history of the cave and its geology.

Europe's largest subterranean lake that can be sailed upon lies between Sion and Sierre. The water grotto is easily accessible and there is a boat tour for viewing it. The guides on the boat tell visitors about the history of the cave and its geology.

Ebenalp and Wildkirchli

Even the Neanderthals were on Ebenalp (Eben Alp). There are three caves, and it is proven that prehistoric people once lived in them. Today there is a mountain restaurant and an altar at the Wildkirchli Caves. A cable car whisks visitors comfortably to the Alp.

Already Neanderthal men were here where today a cableway sweeps visitors up and over the rugged rocks of the once populated Ebenalp caves - and a great departure point for various discoveries.

"Col-des-Roches" Cave Mills

If brooks and rivers run only sluggishly above ground, hydropower is nearly impossible to harness. That is why the inhabitants of the valley of Le Locle began to use subterranean streams. This is how the cave mills of "Col-des-Roches" arose.

If brooks and rivers run only sluggishly above ground, hydropower is nearly impossible to harness. That is why the inhabitants of the valley of Le Locle began to use subterranean streams. This is how the cave mills of "Col-des-Roches" arose.