First ascent - Finsteraarhorn.

Grindelwald: Unterer Grindelwaldgletscher

Grindelwald: Unterer Grindelwaldgletscher

Grindelwald: First

Grindelwald: First

Grindelwald: Wetterhorn

Grindelwald: Wetterhorn

Grindelwald: Interaktive 360°-Webcam Männlichen

Grindelwald: Interaktive 360°-Webcam Männlichen

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - panoramic view

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - panoramic view

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - Panoramic view

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - Panoramic view

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - Panoramic Eiger view

Grindelwald: Hotel Belvedere - Panoramic Eiger view

Grindelwald: Wetterhorn

Grindelwald: Wetterhorn

Grindelwald: First - LIVE (2168 m.ü.M)

Grindelwald: First - LIVE (2168 m.ü.M)

Grindelwald: Interaktive 360°-Webcam - First

Grindelwald: Interaktive 360°-Webcam - First

Grindelwald › Süd-West: Eigernordwand

Grindelwald › Süd-West: Eigernordwand

Unter Eiger: Grindelwald - Grund Blick nach Norden (Reeti, Aellfluh)

Unter Eiger: Grindelwald - Grund Blick nach Norden (Reeti, Aellfluh)

Alpiglen: Grindelwald-Grund - Bussalp

Alpiglen: Grindelwald-Grund - Bussalp

Grindelwald: Eigernordwand - Hotel Bel-Air Eden

Grindelwald: Eigernordwand - Hotel Bel-Air Eden

Grindelwald: Gasthof Panorama

Grindelwald: Gasthof Panorama

“The very ascent of the Finsteraarhorn from this side is absolutely impossible for human beings”, said Franz Josef Hugi, the natural scientist from Solothurn in 1830.

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Did the chamois hunters Alois Volker and Joseph Bortis as well as Arnold Abbühl, a farm worker of the Grimsel Hospiz, really reach the highest point on August 16, 1812. Did Rudolf Meyer, the industrialist from Aargau, together with Kaspar Huber remain behind exhausted?  The question may never be answered. One thing is sure: Nowadays almost no one ascends on Mayer’s route. It is too long and too difficult for the average alpinist. The guides Jakob Leuthold and Johann Währen from the Hasli Valley explore the normal route via the southwest face and the northwest ridge on August 10, 1839. Hugi, because of a sprained ankle, has to stay behind a little above the 4088-meter saddle, which was later named after him. This saddle was reached as early as 1828 on the first of the three Hugi expeditions to the Finsteraarhorn, but a storm prevented the climbers from continuing. In the summer of 1842, mountain guides reach the summit again, this time accompanied by Rudolf Sulger, a student from Basel, who becomes the first tourist on this mountain.

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