Wine from Graubünden

Bündner Herrschaft

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza III

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza III

Pontresina: Hotel Walther

Pontresina: Hotel Walther

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza II

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza II

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza - Piz Palü

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza - Piz Palü

Berninahäuser: Engadin St. Moritz - Diavolezza, Pontresina

Berninahäuser: Engadin St. Moritz - Diavolezza, Pontresina

Pontresina: Hotel Walther

Pontresina: Hotel Walther

Pontresina: Grand Hotel Kronenhof

Pontresina: Grand Hotel Kronenhof

Morteratsch: Camping Plauns Pontresina

Morteratsch: Camping Plauns Pontresina

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza I

Berninahäuser: Diavolezza I

Pontresina: Engadin St. Moritz - Hotel Saratz

Pontresina: Engadin St. Moritz - Hotel Saratz

Pontresina: Engadin St. Moritz - Ausblick Restaurant Languard

Pontresina: Engadin St. Moritz - Ausblick Restaurant Languard

Berninahäuser: Engadin St. Moritz - Piz Palü und Piz Bernina

Berninahäuser: Engadin St. Moritz - Piz Palü und Piz Bernina

Bergün: Blick auf das Dorf und die Albulalinie

Bergün: Blick auf das Dorf und die Albulalinie

Bergün: Kurhaus

Bergün: Kurhaus

Bergün: Bahnhof

Bergün: Bahnhof

Bergün: Dorf

Bergün: Dorf

Samedan: St. Moritz - Muottas Muragl

Samedan: St. Moritz - Muottas Muragl

Spinas: Trais Fluors

Spinas: Trais Fluors

Samedan: Flughafen Oberengadin, Richtung Ost

Samedan: Flughafen Oberengadin, Richtung Ost

Samedan: Flughafen Oberengadin, Richtung West

Samedan: Flughafen Oberengadin, Richtung West

Samedan

Samedan

Lenz: Urdenfürggli

Lenz: Urdenfürggli

Stürvis: Stierva

Stürvis: Stierva

Filisur: Bahnhof

Filisur: Bahnhof

Brusio: Kreisviadukt

Brusio: Kreisviadukt

Miralago: Lago di Poschiavo - Piz Varuna

Miralago: Lago di Poschiavo - Piz Varuna

Le Prese: GR

Le Prese: GR

Alp Grüm: Berninalinie

Alp Grüm: Berninalinie

Bernina Hospiz: Passo del Bernina

Bernina Hospiz: Passo del Bernina

Bernina Hospiz: Passo Bernina

Bernina Hospiz: Passo Bernina

Even the Romans loved the wine from the Bündner Herrschaft (Graubünden’s Rhine Valley). The sought-after, characteristic Pinot Noir, however, did not become endemic until the beginning of the 17th century.

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The young mercenaries and farmers’ sons from Graubünden brought the Pinot Noir shoots from Burgundy to the Bündner Herrschaft, the most northern part of Graubünden, in around 1630. The clever “Bündner” inhabitants were quick to realize that the Pinot Noir vine thrived in the region’s special climate and on the slatey soil. Within seven years, ninety percent of the vines had been replaced by the Pinot Noir.
“Switzerland’s Burgundy” stretches along the Rhine from Bonaduz to Fläsch. The mild climate, the foehn wind and the lime-rich soil are ideal for the vines – and evidently perfect for the typical Pinot Noir vine.

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