Carnival Customs in Zug (ZG)

Zug

Chriesisturm

Chriesisturm

Bäckermöhli

Bäckermöhli

Bäckermöhli

Bäckermöhli

Greth Schell

Greth Schell

Stadt Zug, Zugersee, Sicht Richtung West

Stadt Zug, Zugersee, Sicht Richtung West

Entladestrasse des Ökihofs

Entladestrasse des Ökihofs

Stadt Zug am Kolinplaz

Stadt Zug am Kolinplaz

Zugersee Webcam

Zugersee Webcam

Zufahrt zum Zuger Ökihof

Zufahrt zum Zuger Ökihof

Zug Hafen

Zug Hafen

Zug am See

Zug am See

Zugerberg

Zugerberg

Wednesday before St. Agatha's Day: Bäckermöhli
Carnival Monday (Monday before Ash Wednesday): Greth Schell
Sunday after Ash Wednesday: Chropflimeh-Singen

The city of Zug celebrates no less than three different customs during carnival time, each organized by a different group.

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On the Wednesday before St. Agatha's Day, the millers, bakers, and confectioners, who together form a brotherhood and guild, meet for a service of remembrance and thereafter enjoy a meal together. Later, the children congregate in the square at the Fishmarket and begin to shout Bäckermöhli, or baker's meal! The guild members respond by throwing pastries, oranges, and little sausages from the balcony to the children below.

A traditional carnival figure in Zug is Greth Schell, who carries her husband home in a basket on her back after he has had too much to drink at the inn. On Carnival Monday, she parades through the streets of Zug, accompanied by seven colorfully dressed Lööli, or fools; for almost a century, the joiners, turners, and coopers have practiced this custom. Similar to the Bäckermöhli, the children receive goodies upon their shouting Greth Schällebei, or Greth Schell.

It used to be customary at the stroke of midnight on Shrove Tuesday for dancing and masquerading to stop. The male dancer then invited his female partner to have a snack and, on the following Sunday, she reciprocated by serving him coffee or wine with doughnuts. Friends and relatives were informed and came to serenade the young couple in return for doughnuts and wine. As they often asked for meh Krapfe, or more doughnuts, the custom received the name Chropflimeh. Since World War II, the traditional costume group of the city of Zug has been responsible for the organization of this event. They arrange for groups of singers, mostly in costume, to go to the homes of couples who would like a traditional serenade and are willing to serve doughnuts and wine from the window for it.

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