Restaurant Kornhauskeller in Bern

Bern

A1 Neufeld dir Forsthaus

A1 Neufeld dir Forsthaus

Bärenplatz, Stadt Bern

Bärenplatz, Stadt Bern

Kirchenfeld

Kirchenfeld

A1 Grauholz direction Zurich

A1 Grauholz direction Zurich

A12 Weyermannshaus direction Fribourg

A12 Weyermannshaus direction Fribourg

Zytglogge, Kramgasse, Bern

Zytglogge, Kramgasse, Bern

Bern

Bern

A1 Betlehem Bern direction Ville

A1 Betlehem Bern direction Ville

Bern-Altstadt - Münstergasse

Bern-Altstadt - Münstergasse

A1 Wankdorf Nord direction Lausanne

A1 Wankdorf Nord direction Lausanne

Bern - Sky View 1

Bern - Sky View 1

A6 Wankdorf Nord direction Grauholz

A6 Wankdorf Nord direction Grauholz

Bärecam

Bärecam

A1 Neufeld dir Wankdrof

A1 Neufeld dir Wankdrof

A6 Ostring direction Wankdorf

A6 Ostring direction Wankdorf

Bern Altstadt - Kramgasse

Bern Altstadt - Kramgasse

A1 Felsenauviadukt direction Vaud

A1 Felsenauviadukt direction Vaud

The Kornhauskeller is one of the most magnificent dining room of Switzerland and the dimensions of the room are an impressive experience. The center and side aisles, which resemble church architecture, lend the Kornhauskeller a sacred grace. A unique room, which invites you to enjoy the atmosphere in the restaurant, the vinotheque, the gallery with bar, lounges and humidor.

Zoom map

Group Activities

Language:
de, en, fr, it

Duration:
1 day

Persons:
1 - 700

Cost:
Yes

Season:
Winter

Share contents

Thanks for your rating
The Kornhaus in Berne was built between 1711 and 1718. It is counted among the major works of Bernese High Baroque. The three upper floors were used as a granary, while the great space on the ground floor served as a market hall on market day and the cellar housed barrels filled with tithed and domain wines. "Venice sits on water, but Berne sits on wine" was a saying from this time.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the situation changed dramatically. Berne lost the lucrative administrative territories. The supply of food provisions was largely privatized and the system of wages in kind for public officials - in the form of wood, grain, and wine - was subsequently abolished. Grain storage facilities lost their proper function.

After a period of diverse usage, the Kornhauskeller was leased as an ale house. Innkeepers served up cheese and sausages on long tables and passed around wine from the vast barrels standing along the side walls.

The agricultural economy continued to slide. And so it was that in 1893, architect Friedrich Schneider was given the job of redesigning the high vaulted space into a venue where festivities could be held. He installed the wooden galleries, opened up the cellar with an impressive set of stairs. Prompted by the painter, heraldist, and municipal councilman Rudolf Münger (1862-1929), the city building administration announced a competition in 1897 aimed at providing the cellar with more colorful painted decoration. Münger submitted a proposal and received the commission.

In 1998, the city began searching for a leaseholder with innovative ideas who could bring new life to the Kornhauskeller. They decided on the BINDELLA companies.

0 Comments

Comment this article

Fields marked with * are required.

Select a different view for your results: