Säntis-Schwägalp

To see Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, France and Italy all at the same time - this can be accomplished from the 2,502-meter-high Säntis. The highest mountain of the Alpstein region is the starting point and destination for mountain tours, hikes and ski trips. more

Chillon

Pilatus

Maker of weather, dragon's lair, home to giants and grave of rulers: Lucerne's very own mountain, Pilatus, is one of the most legendary places in... more

Pilatus
Lake Geneva

Lake Geneva

The Celts called Lake Geneva "Large Water" or "Lem an", and it is to this day called Lac Léman in French. And it is large indeed. Regularly... more

Säntis-Schwägalp

To see Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, France and Italy all at the same time - this can be accomplished from the 2,502-meter-high Säntis. The highest mountain of the Alpstein region is the starting point and destination for mountain tours, hikes and ski trips.

To see Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, France and Italy all at the same time - this can be accomplished from the 2,502-meter-high Säntis. The highest mountain of the Alpstein region is the starting point and destination for mountain tours, hikes and ski trips.

Pilatus

Maker of weather, dragon's lair, home to giants and grave of rulers: Lucerne's very own mountain, Pilatus, is one of the most legendary places in Central Switzerland. And one of the most beautiful. On a clear day the mountain offers a panoramic view of 73 Alpine peaks.

Maker of weather, dragon's lair, home to giants and grave of rulers: Lucerne's very own mountain, Pilatus, is one of the most legendary places in Central Switzerland. And one of the most beautiful. On a clear day the mountain offers a panoramic view of 73 Alpine peaks.

Lake Geneva

The Celts called Lake Geneva "Large Water" or "Lem an", and it is to this day called Lac Léman in French. And it is large indeed. Regularly scheduled lake boats, historic paddle steamers and small ferries ply this 582-square-kilometer body of water.

The Celts called Lake Geneva "Large Water" or "Lem an", and it is to this day called Lac Léman in French. And it is large indeed. Regularly scheduled lake boats, historic paddle steamers and small ferries ply this 582-square-kilometer body of water.