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Living heritage: patois, carnival and national dress

Living heritage: patois, carnival and national dress

The dialect in the Val d'Hérens is particularly strong. On high days and holidays, people wear traditional costume with bright head-squares and aprons made of velvet and silk. On 6 January, bells ring in the start of Carnival; the "Carnaval d'Hérens" is famous for its "Peluches" (wooden masks)...more

Schnapps Theatre

Schnapps Theatre

In Europe's first Schnapps Theatre one can hear "red hot" stories about the production and consumption of pure single-variety schnapps. Ruedi Käser...more

Seeberg Lake

Seeberg Lake

High above the Diemtigtal, at the end of a little side valley and on the...more

Combe Grède

Combe Grède

A huge crevice vertically divides the ridge over St-Imier into two parts...more

Living heritage: patois, carnival and national dress

The dialect in the Val d'Hérens is particularly strong. On high days and holidays, people wear traditional costume with bright head-squares and aprons made of velvet and silk. On 6 January, bells ring in the start of Carnival; the "Carnaval d'Hérens" is famous for its "Peluches" (wooden masks) with cat, fox and wolf faces. The people wearing the masks mingle with the spectators and play all kinds of pranks.

Schnapps Theatre

In Europe's first Schnapps Theatre one can hear "red hot" stories about the production and consumption of pure single-variety schnapps. Ruedi Käser stages unforgettable, fruity experiences with freshly picked fruit and berries from his own farm. During the meal schnapps is distilled on the spot. Under his direction, more than 130 spirits play leading roles in vying for the public's favour.

Seeberg Lake

High above the Diemtigtal, at the end of a little side valley and on the way over to the Simmental, is the picturesque Seeberg Lake (1831 m). This nature conservation area attracts both walkers and bikers. A typical mountain lake with cold, clear water, a very popular place for a day out. There are mysterious underground streams flowing in and out of the lake. The nearby mountain hut is manned in summer.

Combe Grède

A huge crevice vertically divides the ridge over St-Imier into two parts – the Combe Grède. The craggy cliff faces are inhabited by chamois and marmots, even pellegrine falcons and wood grouse can be seen. The 14-km-long and steep walk from Villeret through the Combe Grède direct to the Chasseral is very demanding, takes a good 6 hours and should only be undertaken by experienced hikers. The start and end point can be reached using public transportation.

A huge crevice vertically divides the ridge over St-Imier into two parts – the Combe Grède.