Broken Chair

Genève

Genf: A1 - La Praille dir Acacias

Genf: A1 - La Praille dir Acacias

Genf: Route de Meyrin

Genf: Route de Meyrin

Genf

Genf

Genf: Tunnel

Genf: Tunnel

Genf: A1 - Vengeron - dir. Lausanne

Genf: A1 - Vengeron - dir. Lausanne

Genf: La Terrasse

Genf: La Terrasse

Genf: Route des Jeunes, Les Acacias, en direction de Carouge

Genf: Route des Jeunes, Les Acacias, en direction de Carouge

Genf

Genf

Genf: Pont de la Machine

Genf: Pont de la Machine

This monumental sculpture (12 metres high) was installed in the Place des Nations in August 1997, and is an appeal from the humanitarian organisation Handicap International, urging all nations to sign the Ottowa treaty (for the banning of landmines) immediately.

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The Broken Chair was constructed by renowned sculptor Daniel Berset in 1997 at the request of Handicap International. This image has been around the world and is now regarded as one of the most iconic pieces of 21st century art. Its message is simple: remember the plight of landmine victims and encourage States to commit themselves to the prohibition of cluster munitions. To illustrate this battle, the Broken Chair has only three legs with the fourth being broken halfway up. Despite this, it stands tall and proud and, with a height of 12 metres, is impressive in its dignity.

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