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Hüfifirn 1|2

Hüfifirn 1|2

The Hüfifirn is a glacier between the Urner and Glarus Alps (Western Alps). It is located above the Maderanertal valley and currently has a length of about 7 km. The Hüfifirn originates at the foot of the Clariden (3,267 m above sea level) and is surrounded by other three-thousanders: in the...más

Urner Boden 1|2

Urner Boden 1|2

In the valley town of Linthal lies the starting point for the ascent to the Klausen Pass, which connects the Glarnerland region with Central...más

Braunwald

Braunwald

Braunwald (1,256 m above sea level) is one of the eight car-free health...más

Glarus 2|3

Glarus 2|3

Glarus (472 m above sea level) is the smallest canton capital in...más

Hüfifirn 1|2

The Hüfifirn is a glacier between the Urner and Glarus Alps (Western Alps). It is located above the Maderanertal valley and currently has a length of about 7 km. The Hüfifirn originates at the foot of the Clariden (3,267 m above sea level) and is surrounded by other three-thousanders: in the north by the Schärhorn (3,295 m above sea level) and the Chammliberg (3,215 m above sea level), in the south by the Piz Casarauls (3,063 m above sea level), the Heimstock (3,102 m above sea level), the Piz Cambrialas (3,205 m above sea level) and the Gross Düssi (3,256 m above sea level). With an size of about 13 km², the Hüfifirn is the largest glacier in the canton of Uri. The Hüfifirn is connected with the Claridenfirn through the Clariden Pass and the Hüfi Pass (2,952 m above sea level). The glacier tongue of the Hüfifirn is close to the Hüfisee lake. Because it lies in a narrow and shadowy valley, it extends as far as 1,650 m above sea level and is therefore one of the glacier tongues with the lowest altitude in the Alps. The Hüfisee at an altitude of 1,636 m above sea level is mostly fed by the melt water of the Hüfifirn, the Ruchenfirn, the Bocktschingelfirn and the Hangfirn. Also the Chärstelenbach creek rises here, which runs through the Maderanertal and joins the Reuss near Amsteg. The two chalets of the Swiss Alpine Club SAC near the Hüfi Glacier are popular among tourers: the Hüfi Chalet (2,334 m above sea level) and the Planura Chalet (2,947 m above sea level) south of the Clariden Pass.

The Hüfifirn is a glacier between the Urner and Glarus Alps (Western Alps). It is located above the Maderanertal valley and currently has a length of about 7 km. The Hüfifirn originates at the foot of the Clariden (3,267 m above sea level) and is surrounded by other three-thousanders: in the north by the Schärhorn (3,295 m above sea level) and the Chammliberg (3,215 m above sea level), in the south by the Piz Casarauls (3,063 m above sea level), the Heimstock (3,102 m above sea level), the Piz Cambrialas (3,205 m above sea level) and the Gross Düssi (3,256 m above sea level). With an size of about 13 km², the Hüfifirn is the largest glacier in the canton of Uri. The Hüfifirn is connected with the Claridenfirn through the Clariden Pass and the Hüfi Pass (2,952 m above sea level). The glacier tongue of the Hüfifirn is close to the Hüfisee lake. Because it lies in a narrow and shadowy valley, it extends as far as 1,650 m above sea level and is therefore one of the glacier tongues with the lowest altitude in the Alps. The Hüfisee at an altitude of 1,636 m above sea level is mostly fed by the melt water of the Hüfifirn, the Ruchenfirn, the Bocktschingelfirn and the Hangfirn. Also the Chärstelenbach creek rises here, which runs through the Maderanertal and joins the Reuss near Amsteg. The two chalets of the Swiss Alpine Club SAC near the Hüfi Glacier are popular among tourers: the Hüfi Chalet (2,334 m above sea level) and the Planura Chalet (2,947 m above sea level) south of the Clariden Pass.

Hüfifirn 1|2
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Urner Boden 1|2

In the valley town of Linthal lies the starting point for the ascent to the Klausen Pass, which connects the Glarnerland region with Central Switzerland. After the first few bends, the road reaches an 8-km-long high valley, the Urner Boden (also called «Boden» or «Ennetmärcht»). After years of border conflicts, the exact border between Uri and Glarus was determined in 1315. According to legend, the border stone was set on the spot where two runners, one from Uri and on from Glarus, met. The start signal for the foot race was the wake-up call of two roosters. Because the people of Uri hardly fed their rooster, it crowed much earlier than the Glarus rooster. Therefore, the largest part of the Urner Boden belongs to the canton of Uri today. The Urner Boden is considered the largest alp in Switzerland. Up to 1,200 cows and 700 cattle spend the summer season on this alp, which has been permanently inhabited since 1877. The small settlement of Urnerboden belongs to the municipality of Spiringen. Since the Klausen Pass (1,948 m above sea level) is closed during the winter season, the Urner Boden can only be reached from Glarus. A high route with a magnificent view of the Tödi and the Clariden connects the high plateau of Braunwald with the Urner Boden. The international Klausen hill climb was one of the most spectacular and difficult hill climbs in Europe. It took place between 1922 and 1934 as «Grosser Bergpreis der Schweiz» (great mountain prize of Switzerland). Since 1993, several memorials have been reminiscent of the historic hill climbs. The two events «Urnerbodenschwinget», which takes place every other year, and the «Verenenchilbi», which takes place every year in autumn, are popular as well.

In the valley town of Linthal lies the starting point for the ascent to the Klausen Pass, which connects the Glarnerland region with Central Switzerland. After the first few bends, the road reaches an 8-km-long high valley, the Urner Boden (also called «Boden» or «Ennetmärcht»). After years of border conflicts, the exact border between Uri and Glarus was determined in 1315. According to legend, the border stone was set on the spot where two runners, one from Uri and on from Glarus, met. The start signal for the foot race was the wake-up call of two roosters. Because the people of Uri hardly fed their rooster, it crowed much earlier than the Glarus rooster. Therefore, the largest part of the Urner Boden belongs to the canton of Uri today. The Urner Boden is considered the largest alp in Switzerland. Up to 1,200 cows and 700 cattle spend the summer season on this alp, which has been permanently inhabited since 1877. The small settlement of Urnerboden belongs to the municipality of Spiringen. Since the Klausen Pass (1,948 m above sea level) is closed during the winter season, the Urner Boden can only be reached from Glarus. A high route with a magnificent view of the Tödi and the Clariden connects the high plateau of Braunwald with the Urner Boden. The international Klausen hill climb was one of the most spectacular and difficult hill climbs in Europe. It took place between 1922 and 1934 as «Grosser Bergpreis der Schweiz» (great mountain prize of Switzerland). Since 1993, several memorials have been reminiscent of the historic hill climbs. The two events «Urnerbodenschwinget», which takes place every other year, and the «Verenenchilbi», which takes place every year in autumn, are popular as well.

Urner Boden 1|2
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Braunwald

Braunwald (1,256 m above sea level) is one of the eight car-free health and holiday resorts in Switzerland. The family-friendly and popular holiday region is situated at the Klausen Pass on a sunny terrace in the Glarner Hinterland region - above Linthal and Rüti. The Ortstock (2,717 m above sea level), the local mountain of Braunwald, boasts an impressive panorama with a view of the glaciated summits of the Tödi. The famous threepart Braunwald via ferrata is highly frequented. The Alpine climbing crag offers 40 different climbing routes and is located north of Braunwald near the Eggstöcken (up to 2,449 m above sea level, Vorderer Eggstock). Braunwald is worth a visit not only for climbers, but also for skiers, cross-country skiers, sledgers, mountain bikers and hikers. It has only been permanently inhabited since 1725. In 1897, the lung sanatorium opened its doors (Höhenklinik Braunwald, now part of Reha-Klinik Zurzach). The funicular Linthal (Stachelberg) – Braunwald started operations in 1907. The oldest traverse seat chair lift in Switzerland runs up to the Gumen (1,901 m above sea level). A popular hiking route of 2.5 hours runs from Braunwald via the Bächi Alp to the Oberblegisee lake. A high route with a magnificent view of the Tödi and the Clariden connects the high plateau of Braunwald with the Urner Boden alp. Braunwald is also home of the most elevated Alpine rose gardens (up to 1,900 m above sea level) with 500 different types of roses. Along with Betschwanden, Elm, Engi, Haslen, Linthal, Luchsingen, Matt, Mitlödi, Rüti, Schwanden, Schwändi and Sool, the popular holiday destination has been part of the municipality of Glarus Süd since 2011.

Braunwald (1,256 m above sea level) is one of the eight car-free health and holiday resorts in Switzerland. The family-friendly and popular holiday region is situated at the Klausen Pass on a sunny terrace in the Glarner Hinterland region - above Linthal and Rüti. The Ortstock (2,717 m above sea level), the local mountain of Braunwald, boasts an impressive panorama with a view of the glaciated summits of the Tödi. The famous threepart Braunwald via ferrata is highly frequented. The Alpine climbing crag offers 40 different climbing routes and is located north of Braunwald near the Eggstöcken (up to 2,449 m above sea level, Vorderer Eggstock). Braunwald is worth a visit not only for climbers, but also for skiers, cross-country skiers, sledgers, mountain bikers and hikers. It has only been permanently inhabited since 1725. In 1897, the lung sanatorium opened its doors (Höhenklinik Braunwald, now part of Reha-Klinik Zurzach). The funicular Linthal (Stachelberg) – Braunwald started operations in 1907. The oldest traverse seat chair lift in Switzerland runs up to the Gumen (1,901 m above sea level). A popular hiking route of 2.5 hours runs from Braunwald via the Bächi Alp to the Oberblegisee lake. A high route with a magnificent view of the Tödi and the Clariden connects the high plateau of Braunwald with the Urner Boden alp. Braunwald is also home of the most elevated Alpine rose gardens (up to 1,900 m above sea level) with 500 different types of roses. Along with Betschwanden, Elm, Engi, Haslen, Linthal, Luchsingen, Matt, Mitlödi, Rüti, Schwanden, Schwändi and Sool, the popular holiday destination has been part of the municipality of Glarus Süd since 2011.

Braunwald
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Glarus 2|3

Glarus (472 m above sea level) is the smallest canton capital in Switzerland. Its landmark is the neo-Romanesque church built by the architect Ferdinand Stadler. The city is situated between the Schilt (2,299 m above sea level) and the Vorder Glärnisch (2,327 m above sea level) at the Linth river, which rises in the Tödi Massif. The highest point of the municipality of Glarus is on the 2,914-m-high Bächistock, which belongs to the Glärnisch range. The neighboring municipalities are Glarus Nord, Glarus Süd as well as Muotathal and Innerthal in the canton of Schwyz. After a fire in 1861 destroyed the old quarters of Glarus, the streets were arranged in a grid. The Glarnerland region became known internationally in the 19th century because of its cotton printing (textile printing). The once flourishing textile industry has almost completely been replaced by the service sector and tourism. The 50-km-long Glarner Industrieweg (Glarus Industrial Trail) is devoted to the boom years back then. The oldest brand-name product of Switzerland comes from Glarus as well - the Glarus Schabziger. Zigerstöckli is a famous Glarus cream cheese. The Landsgemeinde (cantonal assembly) takes place on the first Sunday in May. During this assembly at the Zaunplatz, the people of Glarus decide on the future of the canton by raising their hands. The so-called Glarus thrust is important for the field of geology. At the most famous geological outcrop in Switzerland it was discovered how mountains developed by overthrusts.

Glarus (472 m above sea level) is the smallest canton capital in Switzerland. Its landmark is the neo-Romanesque church built by the architect Ferdinand Stadler. The city is situated between the Schilt (2,299 m above sea level) and the Vorder Glärnisch (2,327 m above sea level) at the Linth river, which rises in the Tödi Massif. The highest point of the municipality of Glarus is on the 2,914-m-high Bächistock, which belongs to the Glärnisch range. The neighboring municipalities are Glarus Nord, Glarus Süd as well as Muotathal and Innerthal in the canton of Schwyz. After a fire in 1861 destroyed the old quarters of Glarus, the streets were arranged in a grid. The Glarnerland region became known internationally in the 19th century because of its cotton printing (textile printing). The once flourishing textile industry has almost completely been replaced by the service sector and tourism. The 50-km-long Glarner Industrieweg (Glarus Industrial Trail) is devoted to the boom years back then. The oldest brand-name product of Switzerland comes from Glarus as well - the Glarus Schabziger. Zigerstöckli is a famous Glarus cream cheese. The Landsgemeinde (cantonal assembly) takes place on the first Sunday in May. During this assembly at the Zaunplatz, the people of Glarus decide on the future of the canton by raising their hands. The so-called Glarus thrust is important for the field of geology. At the most famous geological outcrop in Switzerland it was discovered how mountains developed by overthrusts.

Glarus 2|3
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