Valais rye bread AOP: the real thing

Valais rye bread AOP: the real thing

Rye bread from Valais is the only bread in Switzerland that can proudly bear the AOP label. This carries an obligation: only rye that has been grown, milled and processed in Valais can by used to make Valais rye bread AOP. The rustic sourdough...more

Saffron: more precious than gold

Saffron: more precious than gold

Saffron flourishes in only one place in central Europe: the Valais mountain village of Mund. Just five kilograms are harvested a year, laboriously by hand. For Mund saffron comes from the three red stigmas of a crocus flower; it takes 12,000...more

"Cholera": a...

"Cholera" is a pie that probably originated during the cholera epidemics...more

Valais wines: pure sunshine

Valais wines:...

Switzerland's largest winegrowing region is also its most varied: more...more

Valais rye bread AOP: the real thing

Rye bread from Valais is the only bread in Switzerland that can proudly bear the AOP label. This carries an obligation: only rye that has been grown, milled and processed in Valais can by used to make Valais rye bread AOP. The rustic sourdough bread tastes best when it has been kept for two or three days. It can also be made with walnuts or dried fruit.

Rye bread from Valais is the only bread in Switzerland that can proudly bear the AOP label.

Valais rye bread AOP: the real thing
Zoom map

Saffron: more precious than gold

Saffron flourishes in only one place in central Europe: the Valais mountain village of Mund. Just five kilograms are harvested a year, laboriously by hand. For Mund saffron comes from the three red stigmas of a crocus flower; it takes 12,000 flowers to make just 100 grams. The delicacy can be enjoyed in saffron risottos, saffron fondues, parfaits or other desserts.

Saffron: more precious than gold

"Cholera": a Valais curiosity

"Cholera" is a pie that probably originated during the cholera epidemics around 1830. People no longer dared go out onto the street, so to prepare a meal they took whatever they had – potatoes, leeks, cheese, onions, apples, pears, bacon – topped it with pastry, and baked the pie in the oven. Today even top chefs have created their own version of this innovative dish of leftovers.

Valais wines: pure sunshine

Switzerland's largest winegrowing region is also its most varied: more than 50 grape varieties thrive on the sunny slopes above the Rhone. Among them are ancient names such as Petite Arvine, Heida, Lafnetscha, Cornalin and Humagne rouge. But the Valais is also known for the contemporary flair of its innovative winemakers – not least its pioneering women. Stars include Madeleine Gay, Winegrower of the Year 2008, and Marie-Thérèse Chappaz in Fully, who follows biodynamic principles and is famous for her sweet wines.

Valais wines: pure sunshine