Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

You hold a piece of cheese by the fire to melt, scrape some onto a plate – and your raclette is ready! According to legend, a love-struck cheese-maker once inadvertently placed the cheese too close to a fire, so creating the "national" dish of the...meer

Plant Robert: rediscovered

Plant Robert: rediscovered

This ancient grape variety of the Lavaux had been all but forgotten when four enterprising winegrowers in the Cully region had the idea of cultivating the fine red grape again. It paid off. The "Plant Robert" is a characterful wine, comparable to...meer

Malakoffs: potentially addictive

Malakoffs:...

These crispy fritters made with cheese, egg, white wine and Kirsch are...meer

Cardon: a unique vegetable

Cardon: a unique...

The cardoon (French: "cardon") is a thistle-like vegetable cultivated in...meer

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

You hold a piece of cheese by the fire to melt, scrape some onto a plate – and your raclette is ready! According to legend, a love-struck cheese-maker once inadvertently placed the cheese too close to a fire, so creating the "national" dish of the Valais. More certain is that the name raclette (from the French "racler", to scrape) was first used in 1909 at a wine fair in Sion.

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

Plant Robert: rediscovered

This ancient grape variety of the Lavaux had been all but forgotten when four enterprising winegrowers in the Cully region had the idea of cultivating the fine red grape again. It paid off. The "Plant Robert" is a characterful wine, comparable to Gamay; it goes well with rustic fare, but with its finesse can also accompany the most sophisticated dishes with bravura.

Plant Robert: rediscovered

Malakoffs: potentially addictive

These crispy fritters made with cheese, egg, white wine and Kirsch are not free from danger. Quite a few visitors have tasted one, ordered a couple more, then a couple more… the record is supposed to be twelve! The story goes that French-Swiss mercenaries brought the recipe home from the 19th-century Crimean War, perfecting it into today's delicacy.

Malakoffs: potentially addictive

Cardon: a unique vegetable

The cardoon (French: "cardon") is a thistle-like vegetable cultivated in the Geneva Region and neighbouring canton Vaud. It tastes of artichoke and is popular especially during colder months baked in a gratin sauce (gratin de cardon). The cardoon was introduced in the 17th century by Huguenots who had fled to French-speaking Switzerland.

Cardon: a unique vegetable