"Cholera": a Valais curiosity

"Cholera" is a pie that probably originated during the cholera epidemics around 1830. People no longer dared go out onto the street, so to prepare a meal they took whatever they had – potatoes, leeks, cheese, onions, apples, pears, bacon – topped it with pastry, and baked the pie in the oven....meer

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

You hold a piece of cheese by the fire to melt, scrape some onto a plate – and your raclette is ready! According to legend, a love-struck...meer

Plant Robert: rediscovered

Plant Robert:...

This ancient grape variety of the Lavaux had been all but forgotten when...meer

La raisinée: alchemy in a cauldron

La raisinée:...

Raisinée – also known as vin cuit – is age-old culinary alchemy. For...meer

"Cholera": a Valais curiosity

"Cholera" is a pie that probably originated during the cholera epidemics around 1830. People no longer dared go out onto the street, so to prepare a meal they took whatever they had – potatoes, leeks, cheese, onions, apples, pears, bacon – topped it with pastry, and baked the pie in the oven. Today even top chefs have created their own version of this innovative dish of leftovers.

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

You hold a piece of cheese by the fire to melt, scrape some onto a plate – and your raclette is ready! According to legend, a love-struck cheese-maker once inadvertently placed the cheese too close to a fire, so creating the "national" dish of the Valais. More certain is that the name raclette (from the French "racler", to scrape) was first used in 1909 at a wine fair in Sion.

Raclette du Valais AOP: brilliant

Plant Robert: rediscovered

This ancient grape variety of the Lavaux had been all but forgotten when four enterprising winegrowers in the Cully region had the idea of cultivating the fine red grape again. It paid off. The "Plant Robert" is a characterful wine, comparable to Gamay; it goes well with rustic fare, but with its finesse can also accompany the most sophisticated dishes with bravura.

Plant Robert: rediscovered

La raisinée: alchemy in a cauldron

Raisinée – also known as vin cuit – is age-old culinary alchemy. For night after night in autumn, pear or apple juice is boiled down in large cauldrons over an open wood fire. The thickened juice was once a sugar substitute; now it is served with vanilla ice cream, meringues and crêpes, and forms the filling for exquisite cakes, such as the famous gâteau raisinée.

La raisinée: alchemy in a cauldron